Gaining a vision Rasul Allah in Your Dreams


This page is dedicated to the topic of  Gaining a vision  Sayyiduna Muhammad  Sallallahu Alayhi wasallam in Your Dreams and whilst awake and what the different meanings are after you have had a dream

The Methods of how to gain a vision of Sayyiduna Muhammad Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam are from Imam Yusuf al-Nabahani’s, may Allah be pleased with him, monumental Sa‘adat al-darayn fi al-salat ‘ala Sayyid al-kawnayn (Felicity in the Two Abodes Through Prayers upon the Master of the Two Realms – may Allah bless him and grant him peace), details forty (40) tried and true methods for seeing the Prophet Muhammad, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, in a dream gleaned from the works of the early and later spiritual master.

The Various meanings of different situations whilst seeing Sayyiduna Muhammad Sallallahu Alayhi Wasallam are taken from Ta’atir al-Anam fi ta bir al-Manam of Sayyiduna Imam Abd al-Ghani al-Nablusi Rahimahullah & Muntakhab al-Kalam fi Tafsir al-Ahlam by Sayyiduna Imam Muhammad Ibn Sirin Rahimahullah

How to gain a vision of Rasul Allah peace be upon him in your sleep

Meanings of different situation whilst seeing Rasulallah

Seeing Rasul Allah Sallallahu Alayhi wasallam Whilst Being Awake

Notes made by a student of Knowledge

Any good in this is from God, and all mistakes are my own

Responses

  1. subhanAllah salallah tala hu alayhi wasalam the same thing happened alhamdulillah!

  2. I love You Sayyidi Seeker 🙂

  3. May Almighty Allah bless your efforts, and fill the hearts of Muslims with the Mahabbah of His Beloved.

    • Ameen. keep us in your blessed duas shaykh.

    • Ameen Ya Rabb , Please pray for us Sayyidi

  4. Ameen

  5. ON THE MEANS OF BEHOLDING THE PROPHET [Sallalahu ‘Alayhi Wasallam] IN A DREAM translated from Imam Yusuf bin Isma’il al-Nabahani R.A.’s monumental Sa‘adat al-darayn fi al-salat ‘ala Sayyid al-kawnayn (Felicity in the Two Abodes Through Prayers upon the Master of the Two Realms – may Allah bless him and grant him peace): http://ihsanica.com/nabahani_darayn_vol3.html

  6. may Allah reward you Amin

  7. As Salam Alakem.

    Ive been trying to write to ask a couple questions. I live in Binghamton new york. Ive asked the mosque around here but as you have stated in many lectures ive listened to some people have knowledge with little wisdom. Im not saying nothing bad about none may Allah forgive me. I was wondering if I can ask you questions I have and I trust your answers.

    InshaAllah there correct.
    Thank you Sidi.
    InshaAllah ill hear from you.
    Salam Alakem.

    • بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

      Walaykum Salam Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Baraktuh Sidi , please ask any questions and we will answer them InshahAllah !

      JazakAllah Khair

  8. Allah Humma Ameen SallAllah Hu Ala Nabi al Muhammad SalAlllah Hu Alaihi Wasalam!

  9. SalAllah Hu Ala Muhammad SalAllah Hu Alaihi Wasalam

  10. Giving without reserve

    It is with reticence that I write this. I do not wish to place myself on the moral high ground, or to sermonise anyone. This chapter tries to show the truth and importance of dreaming of our Holy Prophet Muhammad . These words seek to confirm that ours is a Prophet of Mercy, a Witness, and a Bearer of Good Tidings. It also aims to portray the consequence of da’wāt in the Masjid al-Harām. It is moreover meant as a method and encouragement for our children to pursue the Countenance of God Most High and to some day, continue with the Prophetic Tradition of raising an orphan for the sake of Allāh, The One of Unbounded Grace. So that they may by this means know that there is more to life than just prayer and fasting. And that they should give of themselves unreservedly. That they might through it also, temper their adhkār with compassion.

    We were asleep at the Mashrabiyya Hotel in Khālid bin Walīd Street in Shubayka, Makkah al-Mukarramah when, by the Mercy of Allāh, I had the most beautiful dream. I saw myself standing in the holy presence of our Truthful Prophet Muhammad . The appearance of the Holy Messenger of Allāh matched scriptural records.
    Our Prophet was spotlessly dressed in white robes and a white turban. I stared aghast. Our Prophet stood about two metres away and faced me directly. Someone so unimaginably holy, so indescribably handsome, one will not come across. I do not have the words with which to suitably portray this most wonderful man, the Seal of the Prophets .
    I reached for my turban, embarrassed for having only a skullcap on my head.
    “Leave it,” I said to myself. “You are in the Company of the Prize of creation.”
    I had, through carelessness earlier in the day, joined the multitude in the Grand Mosque for the mandatory prayer wearing a skullcap, but no turban!
    Brilliance shone from our Guided Prophet . Our Prophet smiled at me. His smile radiated light. I stood alert, too humbled to speak. Smiling back would have been too audacious. I wished that the dream would last forever. The heavenly smile lasted between ten and fifteen minutes, it felt like.

    Al-Hamdu Lillāh. I had never considered myself deserving of such an enormous honour. This was a spiritual experience of the first magnitude. “What does that smile mean?” I wondered. “Why is our Heroic Prophet Muhammad so extremely pleased?” I asked myself over and over again.

    I stared at the House of Allāh for extended periods, contemplating its meaning.

    Deep in thought, I barely noticed the usually persuasive central-African women selling birdseed in small plastic bags as I walked back and forth from the Masjid al-Harām. I was hardly aware of the Turkish female who was dealing in steel daggers on the side of the street. Two men earnestly collecting on behalf of Bosnian refugees also failed to draw my attention. I half-heard a Pakistani lad calling out the price of bottled perfume to prospective customers alongside the road. Malaysian girls trading informally with scarves only just caught my eye. Part of the street had been freshly tarred.

    “Unless you receive the sort of treatment that a host bestows on a guest, don’t ever think that, because you have performed the ziyārah of the Baitullāh, you’ve been the guest of Allāh,” my father had once counselled me.
    A similar comment from my uncle, Haji Suleiman, I had further recollected. He had said to me: “Die persoon was Makkah toe – vra vir hom wat het hy gekry.” This rendered into English, says: “The person has been to Mecca – ask him what he had received [there].”
    I considered his observation a bit harsh then, but the force of his remark was now bearing home on me. He knew what he was talking about. “’Ammie Haji” had taught the Hajj for more than fifty years and had been to Mecca many times. Ihsān comes easily to someone who gets beautiful spiritual experiences. For him it had happened very quickly. Aged twenty-six on his first Hajj in 1949, Haji Suleiman had landed inside the Holy Ka’abah when someone lifted him head-high and tossed him over the 2.25 metre high threshold of the Baitullāh.
    “Did you not get hurt?” I inquired further. “No!” he responded excitedly. “I was young and fit, and had landed on my feet,” he continued proudly. Not just anyone was allowed into the Holy Ka’abah.
    Once over the doorsill, he did not have too far to fall, as the inside floor was 2.2 metres above the ground.
    ’Ammie Haji performed two cycles of discretionary salawāt once inside. From then on, he would wonder who had done him the good turn.
    A number of Muslims before our time had believed that someone who had been inside the House of Allāh would not return home. Such was ‘God’s Will’, they had resolved resignedly. ’Ammie Haji chuckled as he recalled years later how the neighbours in Salt River, on learning of the incident, came to commiserate with his mother on his impending death in Mecca.

    Every Muslim who had walked on the holy soil had the potential for such an experience, I realised. Such incidents might have been more prevalent than was ordinarily heard of, I thought. “You don’t tell just anybody about this sort of thing,” some said “as your sanity could be questioned.” I had for a long time suspected that at least some pilgrims who repeatedly visited the Holy Land, apart from drawing from its built-in holiness, did not preclude themselves from offerings of this nature. It would be silly to think that parallels could not be drawn with al-Madīnah al-Munawwarah in occurrences of this kind. Thinking that this sort of happening was in any way unique to myself, was ludicrous. It would also have been reasonable to expect wondrous incidents of this nature to occur in Jerusalem, as the major Middle Eastern religions agreed on the sanctity of this, the City of the Farthest Mosque. Allāh Had Taken our Reflective Prophet Muhammad on a journey by night from Al-Masjid Al-Harām to Al-Masjid Al-Aqsā in Jerusalem, and the heavens. To Muslims, Al-Aqsā Masjid was the First of the Two Directions of the Formal Prayer.

    Part of my da’wāt in the Holy Mosque in Mecca, was to ask Allāh, The One Who Makes Clear to us His Signs so that we may be grateful, to Grant to ourselves the opportunity and blessings of raising an orphan for His sake.

    Having the money with which to afford to go on Hajj has always been its first consideration. There were many people who had performed the Holy Pilgrimage more often than I. With regard to my parting from the Holy City, though, I had received a fascinating send-off.

    My wife and I had, over a number of years, tried to adopt a baby by applying at several local agencies, and were given all sorts of excuses which disqualified, and sometimes discouraged us. Reasons given were that we were not married according to South African law, that few babies from local Muslim parents came up for adoption, and the fact that we have children of our own. We were also faced with, what was to my mind, the worse aspect of the South African race laws. These regulations and those administering it, in this case, the social workers, prescribed that a ‘brown’ orphaned child had to be matched with ‘brown’ adoptive parents. A ‘yellow’ baby could only be placed with prospective ‘yellow’ adoptive parents, a ‘white’ orphan could not be raised by ‘black’ adoptive parents, and so on. They played dominoes with human lives. Some social workers were more ready to read the ‘race act’ than others.
    In an interview and in response to a question on whether we would mind adopting a child from a ‘lower rung’ of the colour scale, I told them that “a nice green one” would do.
    A jab to my ribs from my wife quickly halted the acid flow down the sides of my mouth. Stirring the ire of our then masters by criticising their political beliefs would not help, she meant. “When the white boss tells a joke, and regardless of its lack of humour – laugh!” she chided me later.
    Race inequalities existing at the time ensured that hundreds of black orphans went begging in more ways than one. It virtually excluded us from adopting a child. No orphans that matched our race and blood mix were on offer and they weren’t likely to easily present themselves for adoption. My wife is of Indian (as in “Indian” from India, as opposed to “American” Indian) stock and I am of well-mixed blood.

    On the morning of Wednesday, 1st June 1994, just three days after arriving back home from Hajj, we received a telephone call from Melanie Van Emmenes of the Child Welfare Society. She explained that a five-month old girl had come up for adoption. The baby had earlier undergone successful abdominal surgery and she asked whether we would adopt the child. We jumped at the chance.

    A rush of adrenaline replaced the after-effects of travel. We were rejuvenated. Capetonians usually visit local pilgrims before departure and also on their arrival back home. We excused ourselves from the few visitors and asked my mother-in-law to host them in our absence. My wife and I immediately went to the Adoption Centre in Eden Road, Claremont. We signed the necessary papers.

    Afterwards, we told our children that we were about to receive an addition to the family. Rifdah, the youngest, had started primary school at Habibia. We plodded through a maze of red tape in order to legalise the adoption process. (My wife and I had to marry in court because Muslim marriages were not recognised then, believe it or not). A few days later, my wife, brother and I collected the petite infant from a foster-mother in Newfields Estate. I shall never forget the joyous feeling when I first carried the frail waif past the front door. Her name is Makkia. We named her after the great city from which we had just returned.

    Taking her into our modest home is one of the better things that we have done. Her growing up with the other children has made matters easy. Rashieda being a housewife helped. Makkia has added a marvellous dimension to our lives. She is part of our life’s-work.

    I shall always be grateful to the people who had assisted us with the adoption. In a letter of recommendation to the social workers, Haji Achmat Lalkhen al-Qādirī al-Chishtī wrote that he could vouch for my decent parents. Sheikh Mogammad Riefaard bin Moegsien Manie al-’Alawī al-Qādirī al-Chishtī had stated as a character reference that I was ‘of sober habits’.

    Raising an orphan means giving from the innermost recesses of one’s heart.

    “There should be no orphanages within our community, as we should look after helpless children,” is a common refrain amongst local Muslims. Every orphanage is an indictment on Muslim society and a blight against our culture.

    Adoption is a superb act of charity and the most effective form of da’wah. Not everyone is big-hearted enough to raise someone else’s child.

    If every able married couple took in an orphan, the world would be a better place.

    The number of abortions due to unwanted pregnancies would perhaps decrease if affected pregnant women were assured of good adoptive homes for their babies.

    Couples with an adopted child will think twice before they consider divorce.

    Adoption springs from the soul of the adoptive parent.

    We cry when a child is orphaned. The inhabitants of heaven cry more.

    The meaning behind the glowing smile from our Trustworthy Prophet Muhammad had played itself out in the most delightful way. My dream shows our Prophet’s level of awareness and highlights his profound love for orphans and how kindly he looks on raising an orphan. It demonstrates that raising an orphan is an immensity before God. In our Prophet we have a beautiful pattern of conduct. Our Affectionate Prophet Muhammad , also, had raised a destitute child. Our Divinely-inspired Prophet is the first of the God-fearing. No person is better than him. He had scaled the peak of human tenderness and is without sin. Our Faultless Prophet is the foremost of those who submit to the Will of Allāh. An exemplar to those who worship God, our Kind-hearted Prophet Muhammad is the beacon of the pious. Religion is a feature that has encompassed all cultures throughout history. He had brought a religion of kindness and peaceful coexistence. Sent by God with an easy and straightforward religion, our Prophet Muhammad is the leader of the prophets. Like a lamp that spreads light, the Messenger of Allāh invites to the Grace of Allāh by His leave. Allāh, The One Who Built over us the seven firmaments, Had Entrusted him with all the people of the earth. He is an inspiration to those who are thankful to God and the leader of those who remember Allāh . How should I express gratitude to the Holy Messenger of Allāh for his kind intervention? I am unworthy of untying the thongs of our Prophet’s sandals.

    From the Sunan Abū Dāwūd, Volume III, Book XXXVI, the ‘Book on General Behaviour’ (Kitāb al-Ādāb), Chapter 1773: ‘Mercy’, Hadīth Number 4923, translated with explanatory notes by Professor Ahmad Hasan:
    ’Abd Allāh b. ’Amr reported the Prophet (May Peace Be upon him) as saying: The Compassionate One Has Mercy on those who are merciful. If you show mercy to those who are on the earth, He Who Is in the heaven Will Show Mercy to you.

    From The Kitāb al-Āthār of Imam Abū Hanīfah – the Narration of Imam Muhammad ibn Al-Hasan ash-Shaybānī by Al-Imām Abū Hanīfah Nu’mān ibn Thābit, translated by ’Abdassamad Clarke, with explanatory footnotes by Hāfidh Riyād Ahmad al-Multānī, the Section called ‘Miscellaneous’, Chapter 291: ‘Gentle Conduct and Meanness’, Narration Number 887:
    Muhammad said, “Abū Hanīfah informed us saying, ‘Ayyūb ibn ’Ā’idh narrated to us from Mujāhid who ascribed it directly to the Prophet as a marfu’ hadith that he said, “If people were to look at the quality of gentleness, they would not see any more beautiful creation of Allah. If they were to look at evil disposition, they would not see any uglier creation of Allah.”’”

    From the Sunan Abu Dawud, Volume 5, Book 40: the ‘Book on Etiquette’ (Kitāb al-Ādāb), Chapter 10: ‘Regarding Gentleness’, Hadīth Number 4809, Ahâdith edited and referenced by Hâfiz Abu Tâhir Zubair ’Alī Za’î, translated by Yaser Qadhi and Nasiruddin al-Khattab, editing by Huda Khattab, final review by Abû Khaliyl:
    It was narrated that Jarīr said: “The Messenger of Allāh said: ‘Whoever is deprived of gentleness, he is deprived of all goodness.” (Sahīh)

    From the Sahīh al-Bukhārī, Volume 8, Book LXXII: “The Book on Al-Ādāb (Good Manners)”, Chapter 27: ‘Being merciful towards people and animals’, Hadīth Number 42, translated by Dr Muhammad Muhsin Khan:
    Narrated Jarīr bin `Abdullāh : The Prophet said, “He who is not merciful to others, will not be treated mercifully.

    From the Sahīh al-Bukhārī, Volume 9, Book XCIII: ‘The Book on Tauhīd (Monotheism)’, Chapter 2: ‘Say: Call upon Allāh or call upon Ar-Rahmān’, Hadīth Number 473, translated by Dr Muhammad Muhsin Khan:
    Narrated Jarīr bin `Abdullāh : Allāh’s Apostle said, “Allāh will not be merciful to those who are not merciful to mankind.”

    From the Sahīh Muslim, Volume IV, Book XXX: the ‘Book on Virtue, Good Manners and Joining of the Ties of Relationship’ (Kitāb al-Birr Wa’s-Salāt-i-Wa’l Ādāb), Chapter MLXXIII: ‘Merit of Benevolent Treatment’, Hadīth Number 6270, translated into English by ’Abdul Hamīd Siddīqī:
    Jarīr reported from Allāh’s Messenger (May Peace Be Upon him): He who is deprived of tenderly feelings is in fact deprived of good.

    From the Sunan ibn Mājah, Volume V, Book 33, the Arabic Kitāb al-Ādāb, the ‘Book on Ādāb’ (the ‘Book on Etiquette’), Chapter 9, the Chapter called ‘Tenderness’, Hadīth Number 3688, translated into English by Muhammad Tufail Ansārī:
    Abū Huraira (Allāh Be Pleased with him) reported the Holy Prophet (Peace and Blessings of Allāh be upon him) to have said, “Verily, Allāh is Kind and He Loves kindness. He Grants reward for it (tenderness) and He does not Grant it for roughness.”

    From the Riyād as-Sālihin by Imām Nawawi, rendered into English by Abdur Rehman Shad, Volume 1, Chapter 74: “Politeness, Tolerance and Gentleness”, Hadīth Number 636:
    ’Ā-ishah (Allāh Be Pleased with her) has reported that the Holy Prophet (Peace and Blessings of Allāh Be Upon him) said: Allāh is kind and loves kindness in all affairs.

    From the book called The Soul: The Condition of the Souls of the Dead and the Living according to the Book, the Sunnah, the Traditions and the Sayings of the Scholars by Al-Imam ibn Qayyem al-Jawziah, translated from the Arabic Kitāb Ar-Rūh by Ismail Abdus Salaam, Page 326, from the Chapter headed Is the Nafs One or Three?, the section named The Difference Between a Soft Heart and Anxiety:
    Anas has said: The Messenger of Allah (May Allah Send Salutations upon him) was the most merciful to the needy.

    From the Shamaa-il Tirmidhi abridged, the English translation of Shaykhul Hadith Maulana Muhammad Zakariyya Kandhelwi’s Khasaa-il Nabawi Sallallahu ‘Alayhi Wasallam by Muhammad Bin Abdur Rahman Ebrahim, the Chapter on the seeing of Sayyidina Rasulullah Sallallahu ‘Alayhi Wasallam in a dream, (395) Hadith Number 7:
    Anas Radiyallahu ’Anhu reports that Rasulullah Sallallahu ‘Alayhi Wasallam said: “The one who sees me in a dream has really seen me, because the shaytaan cannot impersonate me.” He also said: “A dream of a Muslim (conveyed through an angel) is a portion from the forty six portions of nubuwwah.”

    From the Sunan Abu Dawud, Volume 5, Book 40: the ‘Book on Etiquette’ (Kitāb al-Ādāb), Chapter 88: ‘Regarding Dreams’, Hadīth Number 5023, Ahâdith edited and referenced by Hâfiz Abu Tâhir Zubair ’Alī Za’î, translated by Yaser Qadhi and Nasiruddin al-Khattab, editing by Huda Khattab, final review by Abû Khaliyl:
    Abū Hurairah said: “I heard the Messenger of Allāh say: ‘Whoever sees me in a dream, he will see me when he is awake’ or ‘it is as if he has seen me when he is awake, for the Shaitān cannot appear in my form.” (Sahīh)

    From the Sahīh Muslim, Volume IV, Book XXIX: Kitāb Fadā’il al-Sahābah – the ‘Book Pertaining to the Merits of the Companions (Allāh Be Pleased with them) of the Holy Prophet (May Peace Be Upon him)’, Chapter MXXI: ‘The Merits of Jarīr b. ‘Abdullah (Allāh Be Pleased with him)’, Hadīth Number 6050, translated into English by ’Abdul Hamīd Siddīqī:
    Jarīr b. ‘Abdullah said: Allāh’s Messenger (May Peace Be Upon him) never refused me permission to see him since I embraced Islam and never looked at me but with a smile.

    From the Sahīh al-Bukhārī, Volume 7, Book LXIII: “The Book on Divorce”, Chapter 25: ‘The Li’ān’, Hadīth Number 224, translated from Arabic:
    Narrated Sahl : Allāh’s Apostle said, “I and the one who looks after an orphan will be like this in Paradise,” showing his middle and index fingers and separating them.

    From the Sahīh al-Bukhārī, Volume 8, Book LXXII: “The Book on Al-Ādāb (Good Manners)”, Chapter 24: ‘The superiority of the guarding of an orphan’, Hadīth Number 34, translated from Arabic:
    Narrated Sahl bin Sa’d : The Prophet said, “I and the person who looks after an orphan and provides for him, will be in Paradise like this,” putting his index and middle fingers together.

    From the Sunan Abū Dāwūd, Volume III, Book XXXVI: the ‘Book on General Behaviour’ (Kitāb al-Ādāb), Chapter 1840: ‘On a Man Who Takes the Responsibility of an Orphan’, Hadīth Number 5131, translated with explanatory notes by Professor Ahmad Hasan:
    Sahl (b. Sa’d) reported the Prophet (May Peace Be upon him) as saying: I and the one who takes the responsibility of an orphan will be in Paradise thus, and he joined his middle finger and forefinger.

    From the Jâmi’ Tirmidhi by Imam Muhammad ibn ’Isa Tirmidhi, original translation and commentary by Dr Maulana Fadl Ahmad, translated into English by Rafique Abdur Rehman, Volume One, Section 30: ‘Chapters on Piety and Joining Ties Narrated from Allah’s Messenger ’, Chapter 14: “About being compassionate to orphans and bringing them up”, Hadīth Number 1925:
    Sayyidina Sahl ibn Sa’d reported that Allah’s Messenger said, “I and the guardian of an orphan will be in paradise like this,” and he gestured with his two fingers, the index finger and the middle finger.

    From Imam Bukhari’s Book of Muslim Morals and Manners (translated from the Arabic al Adab al Mufrad by Yusuf Talal DeLorenzo), the Section called “The Best Home is One in Which an Orphan is Treated Well”, Hadīth 137:
    … Abū Huraira reported that the Prophet of Allāh, upon him be peace, said, “The best home among the Muslims is the one that treats an orphan well. The worst home among Muslims is the one that treats an orphan poorly. I and the one who cares for an orphan will be like these two in Paradise.” The Prophet indicated his two fingers.

    From the Sahīh Muslim, Volume IV, Book XL: the ‘Book Pertaining to Piety and Softening of Hearts’ (Kitāb al-Zuhd wa al-Raqā’iq), Chapter MCCXVIII: ‘Benevolent Treatment to the Widows, Orphans and the Poor’, Hadīth Number 7108, translated into English by ’Abdul Hamīd Siddīqī:
    Abū Huraira reported that Allāh’s Messenger said, “One who looks after the orphan whether he is his relative or not, I and he will be together in Paradise like this,” and Mālik (explained it) with the gesture by drawing his index finger and middle finger close together.

    From the Muwatta of Imam Mālik ibn Anas, Book XXXII: the Arabic Kitāb al-Jāmi’, Chapter 548: ‘The Sunnah on the Hair’, Hadīth Number 1706, translated from Arabic by Professor Muhammad Rahimuddin:
    Safwān ibn Sulaim learnt that the Apostle of Allāh (May Peace Be upon him) said: I and the one who brought up an orphan, whether he be his relation or not, would be like these two fingers in Heaven when he acts piously. He pointed to his fore and middle fingers.

    From the Riyād as-Sālihin by Imām Nawawi, rendered into English by Abdur Rehman Shad, Volume 1, Chapter 33: “Benevolent Treatment towards Orphans, Girls, the Weak, the Poor and Humble Persons”, Hadīth Number 272:
    It is narrated on the authority of Abu Shuraih Khuwailid ibn ’Amr Khuzā’i (Allāh Be Pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allāh (Peace and Blessings of Allāh Be Upon him) said: Allāh, I declare that it is a sin if anyone fails to safeguard the rights of two weak ones: orphans and women. (Nasā-i)

    From the Sahīh Muslim, Volume III, Book XXI: Kitāb al-Ashriba – the ‘Book on Drinks’, Chapter DCCCLXI: ‘Excellence of Sharing Little Food’, Hadīth Number 5112, translated into English by ’Abdul Hamīd Siddīqī:
    Jābir reported Allāh’s Messenger (May Peace Be Upon him) as saying: Food for one (person) suffices two, and food for two (persons) suffices four persons, and food for four persons suffices eight persons.

    From the Sahīh Muslim, Volume IV, Book XXIX: Kitāb Fadā’il al-Sahābah – the ‘Book Pertaining to the Merits of the Companions (Allāh Be Pleased with them) of the Holy Prophet (May Peace Be Upon him)’, Chapter MXCVI: ‘The Merit of According Benevolent Treatment to Daughters’, Hadīth Number 6364, translated into English by ’Abdul Hamīd Siddīqī:
    Mālik reported Allāh’s Messenger (May Peace Be Upon him) as saying: He who brought up two girls properly till they grew up, he and I would come (together) (very closely) on the Day of Resurrection, and he interlaced his fingers (for explaining the point of nearness between him and that person).

    From the Jâmi’ Tirmidhi by Imam Muhammad ibn ’Isa Tirmidhi, original translation and commentary by Dr Maulana Fadl Ahmad, translated into English by Rafique Abdur Rehman, Volume One, Section 30: ‘Chapters on Piety and Joining Ties Narrated from Allah’s Messenger ’, Chapter 13: “Excellence of looking after daughters”, Hadīth Number 1921:
    Sayyidina Anas ibn Maalik reported that Allah’s Messenger said, “As for him who sustains two girls, I and he will enter paradise like these two,” and he gestured with two fingers (the index and [the] next fingers).

    May Allāh, The One Who Befriends the righteous, Send His Richest Peace and Blessings Upon our Holy Prophet Muhammad and on his family and companions, as much and as often as Allāh Wills.

    Allāh, The One Who Is Sufficient For those who put their trust in Him, Had Accepted our prayers and Granted our want through the barakah of our Beloved Prophet Muhammad .

    I’ve been fairly constant about wearing a turban during ’ibādāt since.

  11. SubhanAllah @ the last comment. 🙂

  12. Salam alikum, I am from Australia and really want to buy this book. Can some one guide me where can I buy it from. I can pay via paypal only. Jazak Allah!

  13. salam alaikum, I am from singapore ,Ameen ya Rab
    bros and sis everywhere include my name in your duas,
    wa salaam

  14. Asalam alaikum, I am from singapore ,Ameen ya Rab
    bros and sis everywhere include my name in your duas,
    wa salaam


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